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https://forestrycommission.blog.gov.uk/2021/09/03/the-facts-climate-change-and-resilient-woodlands/

The facts: Climate change and resilient woodlands

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Climate change and resilience

Infographic depicting the facts around climate change, the impact on our planet and what we can do to help. Text from top to bottom: THE TIME TO ACT IS NOW Our climate is changing. Even with very ambitious actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions globally, some climate change is inevitable up to at least 2050. We must make significant management changes now to help our trees, woods and forests adapt. THE FACTS With the current projections, global warming is projected to increase by a further degree within the next two decades. However, global temperatures could rise to 4°C above pre-industrial levels by the end of the century, and summer maximum temperatures could rise by up to 10°C in parts of England. England’s woodlands and forests have developed in a stable and predictable climate. (Under image of scales with a map of UK undernath wighing sun and snow) Without human action, it’s probable that the rate of change is greater than which our woodlands can adapt to. (underneath an image of the world being held in two hands) Global emissions are currently tracking close to some of the more extreme projections that have been published. (underneath an image of a graph showing a plane pointing diagonally up to the right). THE IMPACT Drought in summer and more rain in winter (under two graphics, the left one showing sun over dry ground and the right one rain over grey water) Longer growing season (under a graphic of a cycle showing clockwise; sun to rain cloud to leaf to snow) Increased threat of tree pests and diseases (underneath three graphics showing a disease molecule a caterpillar and a beetle) Severe wind and catastrophic windblow (under a graphic showing a large cloud blowing wind) Increased risk of wildfire (underneath a graphic showing fire) THE SOLUTION Planting and managing trees, forests and woodlands so that they are fit for current and future climates must be part of our response. If you own or manage woodland, you have a key part to play through active management. Promote species able to tolerate future climate conditions (Underneath a graphic showing sun and cloud in a clear sphere) Opt for continuous cover methods of silviculture (underneath a graphic showing trees and a stack of timber) Use mixtures of species that mutually benefit one another and are compatible in growth rate and shade tolerance (underneath a graphic showing three different sorts of tree leaves) Encourage natural regeneration to improve genetic diversity and tree quality (underneath a graphic showing a large log) Consider provenance when sourcing planting stock and use suppliers with high biosecurity standards ( underneath a graphic showing a map of the uk with a magnifuing glass over the top)

Our climate is changing. Even with very ambitious actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions globally, some further climate change is inevitable up to at least 2050. Planting and managing trees, forests and woodlands so they are fit for current and future climates must be part of our response.

The time for action is now

Trees play a key role in greenhouse gas removal but can only help mitigate the impacts of a changing climate if they are resilient to those challenges themselves. Species composition, structure and active management will give our woodlands the best chance of survival when our climate inevitably changes.

We need a strong response

The Forestry Commission plays a key role in helping landowners and land managers achieve healthy, resilient woodlands.

We want everybody to take responsibility for our trees and our climate. Share our messages to spread the word and help safeguard our trees for the future.

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